Thursday, July 31, 2014

Driving and Martial Arts

Writing Contributor: Christie McGowan
Student at Choe's HapKiDo of Loganville
Info Page: http://www.loganvillekarate.com/
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A little bit of martial arts training goes a long way. For instance, it improves a driver’s ability to drive better because martial artists work towards similar ethics.
While driving provides a way to travel, it still requires drivers to use their senses in order to avoid accidents. They must train their minds to multi-task and their bodies to control the vehicle. By spending time practicing a martial art like Choe’s HapKiDo, drivers will have the opportunity to work on their mind and body capabilities. As a result, practicing on skills outside of driving time will improve one’s concentration, anxiety, and respect for others.
The elements of the road to success:
  • Focus. Driving requires people to watch out for multiple hazards: speed, tailgaters, trash, pedestrians, drivers chatting on the phone, drivers changing lanes without signaling, and much more. Missing these hazards can be the result of giving attention to things not as important as the road: the radio, the phone, or the day's problems. At Choe’s HapKiDo, students learn quickly that lack of concentration has consequences—from messed up kicks to kicked fingers, practice requires attention of the whole mind. For instance, the eyes have at least one spot to concentrate on when practicing to roll, flip, and kick. By spending time practicing to focus on at least one object at a time, one increases his/her attention span.
  • Relax. Drivers can make other drivers’ day harder. With all the honking and drivers doing insane things, stress builds up. By spending a few times a week at Choe’s HapKiDo, people learn and have the opportunity to meditate, which promotes better breathing and a time to get into focus mode. On top of that, tension is relieved from the exercise, specifically from the kicking and yelling. Finding ways to let off steam also prevents health problems and contributes to a healthy mental state.
  • Respect. Lives on the road are at stake, at the mercy of other drivers. From training with peers and instructors at Choe’s HapKiDo, martial artists develop respect on different levels. There is the necessity of showing respect to others, but there is also the necessity to place trust in each other’s hands when training. As everyone there is learning how to defend for his/her life, it is eventually understood the value of life. It can easily be taken away. So when on the road, stopping to let someone out of a parking lot will make his/her day easier. In fact, being courteous to other drivers allows control over many situations.
Driving is harder than it looks, but practicing martial arts will make the job easier. By having a more relaxed state-of-mind and an increased attention span, driving and other activities are seized with confidence.

For more information on Choe’s HapKiDo Karate, visit: http://www.loganvillekarate.com/index.php. Take a look at our kickboxing classes too! Both are fun, and you can come in to trial both for free!

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