Thursday, September 25, 2014

Respect Goes A Long Way with Loganville HapKiDo



Writing Contributor: Christie McGowan
. . .
If not for respect, and if everyone instead acted on self-preferences, the world would be in constant chaos. Just imagine it – a world lacking respect would result everyone being more careless and less trustworthy. People wouldn’t care about others so much, and people would be greedier because gratitude would also not exist.

The effects of respect—showing gratitude, trust, and sensitivity towards others—allows peace to be possible. For example, respect between the bond of parent and child allows both sides to grow positively. If the child shows respect towards parent, it means he/she understands the purposes for parents. From years of receiving shelter and love, children grow up with gratitude and try to show it—if not from listening and obeying, then definitely through holidays and birthdays. If children show respect, then parents will also have respect for them. So, for there to be peace, everyone has to be on the same page.

At Choe’s HapKiDo in Loganville, we care to influence respect to our students. Through practices of different styles of bowing and attentive listening, HapKiDo students carry the principles of respect into other areas of their lives: home, school, work, and social events. And eventually, they realize that they have also gained respect from their surrounding peers.

For more information on Choe’s HapKiDo in Loganville, visit: http://www.loganvillekarate.com/index.php.





Thursday, September 18, 2014

Loganville HapKiDo Teaches Self-Discipline



It’s the little things that we miss
[Ignoring mom and eating more than 2 cookies
Buying something you didn’t plan on
Having a mean comment put you in a bad mood
Getting onto Facebook too often during study hours
Letting self to not finish a book]

Before they escalate.
[Consuming an entire plate even though full
Having a closet full of unused and old stuff
Pushing over your brother because he hit you first
Lacking the ability to concentrate
Dismissing a goal]

But with a little self-discipline,
[Watching your portions
Making effort to give and save
Calming down
Avoiding distractions
Pushing through]

You happily accept the consequences!
[Looking good
Being good
Feeling good
Clapping good
Mighty good]

. . .

Self-discipline is the key when training at Choe’s HapKiDo in Loganville. Students learn to tackle all situations with perseverance, decision making, and good attitude. Watch your child grow within a year’s worth training. You’ll notice a big change in your child’s stride.

For more information, visit: http://choeshapkido.com/loganville/.

-By: Christie McGowan-


Monday, September 8, 2014

HapKiDo's Self-Defense Tactics: Still Targets vs. Moving Targets


Writing Contributor: Christie McGowan

. . .

HapKiDo's style of self-defense teaches people how to block in three ways: hand against hand, hand against weapon, and weapon against weapon. From day one of training, students learn the essentials of defense such as kicking, punching, and escaping strategies. Overall, training consists of practicing on still and moving targets.

Students at Choe's HapKiDo in Loganville experience hands-on the differences between practicing defense on still targets versus moving targets. Still targets include kicking targets of all sizes, while moving targets consists mainly of sparring opportunities.  

With more experience, students see how practicing both styles complement each other. For example, still targets permit one to practice moves at his or her own pace. It is a chance to practice theory and technique. If the student misses a target, he/she can try again. On the other hand, sparring has a complete opposite effect to where missing has consequences. As a result, sparring demands speed, timing, and accuracy.

Out of the two styles, sparring looks more intimidating. But like everything else, it is less scary with more practice. Sparring may seem extreme, but this part of training is to help prepare the body and mind for self-defense in real life.  

For more information on how to try Choe's HapKiDo in Loganville, visit http://www.loganvillekarate.com/index.php. We love to give everyone a free trial!


**More information on sparring:


Friday, September 5, 2014

Loganville HapKiDo Karate Teaches Confidence

. . .

The truth about lack-of-confidence is that it has no age limit; it is a feeling that both children and adults relate to. At Choe’s HapKiDo in Loganville, we understand that the reasons for lack of confidence are endless, but they are reasonable: the feeling of inadequacy compared to others; a history of negative feedback; the fear of being wrong; the idea of set-limitations. Our martial art program is developed to show students how to grow in confidence.

The Outcomes of Confidence:

SELF-ESTEEM BOOST. From day to day training, HapKiDo instructors make sure a student knows when something is done right. Through hard work and a positive attitude, students experience the feeling of being correct. And after one technique is conquered, students find energy to keep at it.

REALIZED POTENTIAL. The best part of watching progression in the training studio is when the student realizes it. It is like suddenly, a light bulb flashes and he/she witnesses the growth. Maybe an increase in strength is noticed, or a kick is flawless. But regardless, seeing the changes influences the want to do more.

NEW FOUND INDEPENDENCE. The instructors train students every step of the way until they believe he/she is ready for the next belt test. The belt tests allow students to perform independently. And after a new belt is achieved, it is understood that it was earned.

Although confidence can result in cockiness and false-pride, consistent training results in the students developing confidence in a healthy way. From being corrected on technique and etiquette, students learn that perfection comes from listening to advice and persevering to try again and again.
For more information about Choe’s HapKiDo in Loganville, visit: http://www.loganvillekarate.com/index.php

. . .

Writing Contributor: Christie McGowan 





Monday, September 1, 2014

The Fun of Bringing a Friend to Karate Class


Writing Contributor: Christie McGowan


. . .

Training update: I recently passed another belt test! The success now allows me to enter yellow belt training!

The first few tries of practicing double inside kicks brought me back to ballet class, when trying to nail a series of single pirouettes.  But unlike pirouettes that call for precision and poise, each spinning kick ended with loud yells from the gut. In the words of my friend Emily, who came to class with me a while ago, “It’s (karate) like angry ballet!”

Emily made the first day of yellow belt training memorable. As she is the first person to approach me about karate lessons, I couldn’t help but feel excited to bring her to class. After days of figuring out a mutual schedule and finding out that we’re both huge Harry Potter fans, she participated in her first day of karate training – and it is thanks to the free trial offered at Choe’s HapKiDo in Loganville. Her session had her stretch, kick, yell, somersault, and learn a couple of self-defense techniques. She mingled with my HapKiDo peers and found she liked them. She cannot wait to come back again!  

Meeting new HapKiDo students is always a pleasure and sometimes brings me back to my first day. But I now know it is a different feeling when you help a friend on his/her first day. It definitely becomes a new topic/hobby to talk about and do.

For more information on how to start a free trial at Choe’s HapKiDo in Loganville, visit: http://www.loganvillekarate.com/index.php.